New on this page and want to know about the step-by-step process of dyeing cotton? Dyeing with nature

Would you like to know more about how to use carob or dandelion root? Keep updated to find out more. You can subscribe to my blog (see at the end of this post how to).


As a total beginner I started with onion skins on cotton but with the wrong sort of mordant (I used cream of tartar with alum and salt. Go to this page to have the correct step-by-step process). Nevertheless, the effect was marvelous.

I used 25 gram of onion skin, the brownish, papery skin of the most common type, which I saved up for some months in a paper bag. The piece of fabric I dyed weighted 70 gram.

Shop for Pouch Hungarian Onion.


Leah & Judah

Once settled I thought I’d have no stories to tell about the embroidered pieces of fabric. Well, I do. Not traveling does not mean that nothing happens. Yet, this story behind this pouch is rather sad.

Sumac

I stumbled upon sumac without knowing what it was. Sumac, to me, is an ornamental tree with big reddish velvet looking tops sticking up at the end of each branch. Branches are thick, few and each is strong and sturdy. They’re also high and I could not reach them.

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Posts about natural dyeing, my outdoor activities, searching and multiple usage of plants and roots


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